• Megan McArdle, “Retrospective Cold Feet” – from the article: People’s memories change–as Lori Gottlieb points out in Marry Him, scientists who interviewed couples in their first year of marriage, and then again seven years later, found that the happy couples had retroactively rewritten their meeting story to be more positive (love at first sight!) while the people who were having trouble, or divorced, now spoke about their meeting in much less positive terms.
  • On Osama bin Laden’s death – Long War Journal states the obvious: Abbotabad also hosts the headquarters of a Pakistani Army division. Bin Laden’s mansion is said to be located in an affluent area of the city, where numerous retired military and intelligence officials reside. And the mansion is said to be only a few hundred yards away from an Army military academy. Megan McArdle’s reflections are recommended. I’m still thinking about the media cheerleading and celebratory comment threads and facebook posts myself.
  • Malcolm Harris, “Bad Education” – from the article: If tuition has increased astronomically and the portion of money spent on instruction and student services has fallen, if the (at very least comparative) market value of a degree has dipped and most students can no longer afford to enjoy college as a period of intellectual adventure, then at least one more thing is clear: higher education, for-profit or not, has increasingly become a scam.
  • Jay Cost, “Democrats Should Worry About the GOP Field” – from the article: Democrats are hoping that the Republicans nominate somebody like Barry Goldwater, who satisfied the right wing but alienated independent and moderately Republican voters in 1964. However, that has not happened since the AuH2O candidacy, in large part because primaries now dominate the nomination process. That tends to reduce the influence of the most ideologically committed voters, as a broader cross-section of the electorate participates in primaries than party caucuses.